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Prague Walking Tour

Destination(s): Prague

Two long days of sightseeing on both sides of the river. read more about Prague Walking Tour

Wenceslas Square

Wenceslas Square

  • Václavské námestí 68
  • tel:+420 (0)2 2171 4444 (Tourist Information Centre)
  • Prague, 11000

Historically, Wenceslas Square (Vaclavske Namesti) has had many faces. Originally the central horse market in Prague, it later became a hub for political demonstrations (exemplified by the monument to local students who committed suicide in the square in protest of the Soviet invasion of Prague) and local celebrations (such as of major sporting victories). More like a long boulevard than an actual square, the Wenceslas Square of today is lined with restaurants, hotels, bars, clubs, and shops. At the top of the square, you'll find the square's namesake and Czech hero, St. Wenceslas, seated valiantly atop his horse. Behind him lies the National Museum and, just next to that, the Prague State Opera. read more about Wenceslas Square

Jan Hus Monument

Jan Hus Monument

  • Staroměstské náměstí
  • tel:+420 2 2171 4444
  • Prague, 11000
Stavovske Divadlo (Estates Theater)

Stavovske Divadlo (Estates Theater)

  • Železná 540/11
  • (at the bottom of Wenceslas Square, near Mustek metro stop)
  • tel:+420 224 227 981
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 110 00

At the time when it was opened, in 1783, the classicist Estates Theater was called Count Nostitz's Theatre, after the aristocrat who had it built. It was part of 18th century enlightenment principles, which saw theaters as demonstrations of a nation's cultural standards. In 1798 the Czech Estates bought Count Nostitz's theater, re-naming it the Theater of the Estates (Stavovske Divadlo). It was for a time dedicated to showing exclusively Czech performances until 1862, when it was taken over by a German ensemble and re-named the Royal Provincial German Theater. Finally, in 1920, it again became the Theater of the Estates and, except for a brief time during WWII, has maintained this historic name. Although there were some complications, Czech performances took over the stage and this became a place for Czech people to enjoy high art. Here, Mozart premiered two operas, Don Giovanni and La Clemenza di Tito. Still intact, the Estates Theater is Prague's most beautiful theater and experiencing a performance here is a true delight. read more about Stavovske Divadlo (Estates Theater)

Charles Bridge

Charles Bridge

This stunning stone bridge in the Gothic style replaced the Judith Bridge, which collapsed in a flood. Called the Stone Bridge for several centuries after its construction in 1357, Charles Bridge (Karlův most) connects Old Town to Lesser Town. Allegedly, egg yolks mixed into the mortar strengthened the bridge's construction. Perhaps it is those egg yolks that helped Charles Bridge to survive many disastrous floods. At each end of the bridge stands a tower, like bookends for the row of 30 Baroque statues that have lined the bridge since 1657. Today, Charles Bridge is a constantly bustling pedestrian bridge, lively with artists, musicians, and vendors. read more about Charles Bridge

Czech National Bank

Czech National Bank

  • Senovážné nám. 30
  • tel:+420 224 411 111
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 11000
Jo's Bar and Garage

Jo's Bar and Garage

  • Malostranské náměstí 7
  • tel:420 2 2423 3137
  • Prague, 11800
Czech Press Photo

Czech Press Photo

  • Maiselova 2
  • Maiselova 2
  • tel:+420 2 2232 2254
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 11000
Prague Castle

Prague Castle

The Prague Castle (Pražsk hrad) is the largest castle complex in the world and one of the most important cultural sites in the Czech Republic. Founded in the 9th century as a wooden fortress, it expanded to include a palace, three churches, and a monastery. Extensive renovations took place in the early 20th century and again after the Velvet Revolution. Over the course of its many face-lifts, the castle has taken on Baroque, Gothic, and Neo-Gothic qualities. The complex includes three courtyards, in which you can find such important sites as St. Vitus Cathedral, Mihulka Powder Tower, and St. George's Basilica, among others. The ceremony of the changing of the guard takes place every hour; at noon, some fanfare accompanies this ceremony. The Prague Castle currently houses the Czech President and is the seat of Czech political power. read more about Prague Castle

Jewish Museum in Prague

Jewish Museum in Prague

  • U Staré školy 1
  • tel:+420 2 2171 1511
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 110 00
Golden Lane (The)

Golden Lane (The)

  • Jiřská
  • Pražský hrad
  • tel:+420 2 2171 4444
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 11800
Old Town Hall and Astronomical Clock (The)

Old Town Hall and Astronomical Clock (The)

  • Staromestské námestí
  • tel:+420 2 2448 2751
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 11000
Strahov Monastery

Strahov Monastery

  • Strahovske nadvori 1/132
  • tel:420 233 107 722
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 118 00

The Strahov Monastery (Strahovsky Klaster) was established by the Premonstratensians, a Catholic religious order of canons founded by St. Norbert. The Romanesque stone monastery was first built in 1140. However, the abbey has met with serious challenges. In 1258, a fire almost completely destroyed the church. Hussites plundered the monastery, followed by a similar event during the Thirty Years' War. Then, in 1742, the French army bombarded the church. In dealing with this devastation, the Strahov Monsatery was reconstructed in the Gothic style then given Baroque qualities in the early 18th century. Finally, in 1989, the monastery was given back to the Premonstratensians. Today, believers still take pilgrimages to this site. On the Strahov Monastery's peaceful and beautiful grounds are an important museum and word-renowned library, rife with rare volumes. read more about Strahov Monastery

Josefov

Josefov

  • Next to Old Town Square
  • tel:+420 2 2171 4444
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 110 00

Located between Old Town Square and the Vltava River, the Jewish Quarter (Josefov) is what remains of Prague's Jewish ghetto. In the 13th century, Prague's Jewish community was ordered to all move to this one small area. As time passed, the population grew and this part of Prague became extremely overpopulated. In late 19th century, an intense redevelopment was undergone but that doesn't mean the Jewish people were off the hook. They remained in this ghetto until WWII, when the majority of the Czech Republic's Jewish population either died or was forced out of the country by communist leaders. Today, Josefov is an important cultural area. Within its borders lies the best-preserved group of Jewish historical monuments in Europe. This includes six synagogues, including the Old-New Synagogue and the Spanish Synagogue, the Jewish Town Hall, the Old Jewish Cemetery, and museums, such as the comparatively new Robert Guttmann Gallery. Most of these sites are controlled by the Jewish Museum in Prague. read more about Josefov

Petrin Hill Funicular

Petrin Hill Funicular

Czech Museum of Fine Arts (The)

Czech Museum of Fine Arts (The)

Petřín Hill Observation Tower

Petřín Hill Observation Tower

The lookout tower (Petřnsk rozhledna) on Petřn Hill looks much like a miniature Eiffel Tower. Built in 1891 as a celebration of the Czech lands, it initially did the trick. However, since that time it has become a topic of debate, with many people harboring serious dislike for what seems like an inferior version of Paris' main attraction. Although the exterior is the source of some resentment, the tower's purpose makes it a major tourist attraction. Set atop Petřn Hill, it takes a mere 299 steps to reach the top, where a breathtaking view awaits. It is said that on a clear day, you can see 150 km in any direction. Surrounded by beautiful gardens and offering the most comprehensive bird's eye view of the city, Petřn Observation Tower has earned its spot as one of Prague's top-ranking tourist sites. read more about Petřn Hill Observation Tower

Novomestsky Pivovar

Novomestsky Pivovar

U Tri Pstrosu

U Tri Pstrosu

  • Dražického náměstí 12
  • Hotel U Tří Pštrosů
  • tel:420 2 5728 8888
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 11800
Grand Hotel Evropa (The)

Grand Hotel Evropa (The)

  • Václavské náměstí 826/25
  • tel:420 2 2421 5387 / 420 2 2422 8215 (Reservations)
  • Visit website
  • Prague, 110 00