Luxurious Destinations
Las Vegas
Destinations Within Las Vegas

Las Vegas Trip Itineraries

Las Vegas Outside Adventures

Destination(s): Las Vegas

While Las Vegas has long been known as an adult playground, it’s a well-kept secret that Las Vegas also sits in the heart of some of the Mojave Desert’s most beautiful scenery. Red Rock Canyon National Recreation Area contains world-class rock climbing, Valley of Fire State Park has been a background for many movies, and Lake Mead is the largest man-made lake in the United States. If you are more interested in Mother Nature than Lady Luck, you’ll find plenty of places to explore away from the Strip. read more about Las Vegas Outside Adventures

Red Rock Resort

Red Rock Resort

  • 11011 W. Charleston Rd
  • Summerlin
  • tel:866/767-7773
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89135
The Cracked Egg (Cheyenne)

The Cracked Egg (Cheyenne)

  • 7660 W Cheyenne Ave #125
  • tel:702 395 7981
  • Las Vegas, 89129

In just a few short years, The Cracked Egg has grown to become one of Las Vegas' most popular breakfast houses. They use the finest ingredients, eggs, cheeses, fresh fruit, meat, whipped cream, and great coffee. They serve eggs just the way you like them - everything from scrambled to eggs Benedict, and for lunch they have salads, burgers, and great sandwiches. Oh, and don't forget to try the pancakes and waffles. read more about The Cracked Egg (Cheyenne)

Desert Fox Tours

Desert Fox Tours

  • 6525 Dean Martin Drive
  • Grand Canyon Tour Company
  • tel:+1 702 361 0676
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89118
Suncoast Hotel Casino

Suncoast Hotel Casino

  • 9090 Alta Drive
  • tel:+1 877 677 7111 / +1 702 636 7117
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89145
Hash House A Go Go

Hash House A Go Go

  • 6800 West Sahara Avenue
  • tel:+1 702 804 4646
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89146
Papillon Helicopters: Grand Celebration

Papillon Helicopters: Grand Celebration

  • 275 East Tropicana Avenue
  • Suite 155
  • tel:+1 888 635 7272 / +1 702 736 7243
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89109
Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

  • State Route 159 from Charleston Boulevard
  • (17 miles west of the Las Vegas Strip)
  • tel:+1 702 363 1921 (Information)
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89124

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area's towering cliffs look similar to the colorful rock formations in Nevada's Valley of Fire or Utah's Zion National Park, but while it's reminiscent of other areas, Red Rock stands by itself, a lone island of mountains and springs in the middle of the Mojave Desert.

West of Las Vegas, Red Rock sits off State Route 159 (follow Charleston Boulevard west and it will turn into SR159). Admission to Red Rock is $7 per vehicle, and includes admission to the new visitor's center, a map/newsletter.

The visitor's center integrates information, art, and the environment of Red Rock itself. Most of the displays are outside, which is fine for the vast majority of the year in Southern Nevada. Mojave Max, the center's desert tortoise mascot, lives here, along with a few of his friends. The hands-on displays explain the forces that created Red Rock: fire, wind, water, and earth. Keep your eyes open for the colorful birds flying in and out of the inside of the exhibit--the center of the displays is planted with native vegetation.

A one-way scenic drive takes visitors into Red Rock, and it has several places to stop for a hike or to take in a scenic vista; one area, adjacent to the Children's Discovery Trail, has a picnic area next to some springs. Water is plentiful here, so look for wildlife early in the morning and late in the day. You'll see lots of birds, but also look for burros and big horn sheep. Consult the map/newsletter to find a trail that fits your fitness and schedule. Short hikes, like the Children's Discovery Trail, can be completed in under an hour, while a trip to the top of Turtlehead Peak will take you half a day or more.

Winter is a great time to explore Red Rock. Temperatures are generally mild, but the mountains are covered in snow during the coldest months (dressing in layers is highly recommended). Spring and fall are short, but beautiful, with plenty of water from the snowmelt in the streams. Summer is usually far too hot for exploring Red Rock, although short hikes in the very early mornings are often doable. Remember to always bring plenty of water with you, no matter what the time of year, and sunscreen and lip balm are advisable. 

Hikers, bikers, and rock climbers flock to Red Rock. As you drive along the loop, look for the climbers dangling off the rocks of the Calico Hills, and always be on the lookout for bicyclists and pedestrians on the roadways.

This area was settled in the late 1800s, and you can find remnants of its prior history. At Sandstone Quarry, you can see where the blocks of sandstone were carved, and at Pine Creek, a short hike will take you to the foundation of an old homestead. Agave roasting pits and petroglyphs are evidence of far earlier inhabitation.
read more about Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area

Valley of Fire State Park

Valley of Fire State Park

  • Interstate 15 on exit 75, P. O. Box 515
  • (Six miles from Lake Mead)
  • tel:+1 702 397 2088
  • Visit website
  • Overton, 89040

Nevada's oldest state park, founded in 1935, is where red sandstone monoliths and the Mojave Desert meet. Petroglyphs, some almost 3,000 years, old tell the stories of the Anasazi. Petrified trees tell of a time when this ancient valley was lush with vegetation.

Located about an hour outside of Las Vegas, the Valley of Fire sits on the edge of Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Its remote location and brilliantly colored rock formations are a favorite of photographers, film makers, and nature lovers. Far more lightly visited than Red Rock Canyon, the Valley of Fire is a great place to really explore the desert. Petroglyphs are abundant here, and wildlife is easy to spot (since there are so few people). Look for big horn sheep, coyotes, ravens, tarantuallas, and other desert dwellers. Stop at the visitor's center to learn about the history, geology, and flora/fauna of the Valley of Fire.

Star Trek fans may recognize the area around White Domes, a land with brilliantly contrasting sandstone formations, as the place where Captain Kirk died. You'll also find the remnanats of an earlier movie set if you take the hike at White Domes--it's a moderately challenging trail that requires rock scrambling at the beginning, and which leads through an amazing slot canyon. Slot canyons, found throughout the Southwestern United States, allow a person to stand in the middle of the canyon and touch both sides. Dangerous during flash floods, these fascinating paths through the rocks are intriguing and beautiful.

For a short and easy trail, try Mouse's Tank. The trail allegedly got its name because it was a hideout for a Paiute named Mouse, and the tanks are the tinajas (areas in the rocks that fill with water). Kids will love scrambling over the easy-to-climb rocks. Keep your eyes peeled along the trail for petroglyphs, and if you're there in the evening, watch for the bats that are out swooping up bugs as the sun goes down.

Valley of Fire offers camping, hiking, picnicking and spectacular photography. It's a popular outdoor wedding location because of its striking scenery. The camping spots fill up fast in the cooler months, especially on the weekend, so if you'd like to camp here, arrive early. Park fees are often on a honor basis, but rangers do come through and check periodically.
read more about Valley of Fire State Park

Salt Lick

Salt Lick

  • 10972 W. Charleston
  • In Red Rock Resort
  • tel:702/797-7535
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89144
Angel Park Golf Club

Angel Park Golf Club

  • 100 S. Rampart Blvd
  • btw. Summerlin Pkwy. and Alta St.; 20 min. NW of the Strip
  • tel:888/629-3929
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89145
Red Rock Canyon Climbing

Red Rock Canyon Climbing

  • State Route 159 from Charleston Boulevard
  • (17 miles west of the Las Vegas Strip)
  • tel:(702) 515-5138
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89130-2301

Red Rock Canyon NCA is one of the finest rock climbing areas in the world. The main type of rock found here is Aztec (or Navajo) sandstone, formed years ago through the natural cementing of ancient sand dunes. The rock at Calico's 1& 2, and Sandstone Quarry are the focus of sport climbing. The rock of the main escarpment possesses a greater cementing factor and is considered to be a good quality sandstone. The black or varnished rock is generally considered to be the hardest. Keep in mind however, at its best, it is still sandstone. Routes in the Red Rock Canyon NCA are rated via the Yosemite Decimal System. All class V routes (those involving the use of protection) in Red Rock Canyon NCA range from 5.0 (easiest) to 5.14 (most difficult). read more about Red Rock Canyon Climbing

CJ's Texas Barbeque

CJ's Texas Barbeque

CJ's Texas Barbeque is now open in Las Vegas! read more about CJ's Texas Barbeque

Cheesecake Factory

Cheesecake Factory

  • 750 S Rampart Blvd Bldg 17
  • tel:702 951 3800
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89145
Spring Mountain National Recreation Area

Spring Mountain National Recreation Area

  • State Rt. 156/157/158
  • tel:702-873-8800
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89124

Less than an hour from the Las Vegas Strip, the Spring Mountain National Recreation Area is an island of mountains in the middle of the desert. Mt. Charleston, which is how the local collectively refer to the entire area, is actually the name of the highest peak in the Spring Mountain Range. At a little under 12,000 feet, it's also the third highest peak in Nevada.

Two major canyons welcome visitors: Kyle Canyon, where you'll find a village (no grocery store) and two lodges. Lee Canyon is home to homes and snow play areas, including a ski and snowboarding lodge.

Hiking trails can be found in both canyons, and a hike to the peak of Mt. Charleston will take you into designated wilderness. You're likely to see more birds than any other type of wildlife, but look for deer and lots of squirrels. Elk herds also live here, although they are rarely seen. This is a very dry mountain, so if you're hiking, bring water. Water sources are few on Mt. Charleston.

State Highway 158 connects Kyle Canyon to Lee Canyon, making it easy to turn a trip to Mt. Charleston into a scenic loop. Look for picnic areas, campgrounds, and viewing turnouts throughout the entire area. A small visitor center can be found on Kyle Canyon Road, or SR 157.

Officially a part of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, SMNR is home to the bristlecone pine (Pinus longavea), which are some of the world's longest-living plants--the oldest are thousands of years old.

Temperatures here are often 20 degrees cooler than in Las Vegas, and during winter the area is covered in snow. This is the only place close to Vegas where you can ski in winter, and the mountain roads are clogged with locals after the first snowfall--something the residents of Las Vegas don't get to see often.

read more about Spring Mountain National Recreation Area

Fire Ecology Trail

Fire Ecology Trail

  • HCR 33, Box 5500
  • tel:702-515-5000
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89123
JC Wooloughans Irish Pub

JC Wooloughans Irish Pub

  • 221 North Rampart Boulevard
  • JW Marriott Las Vegas Resort Spa & Golf
  • tel:702 869 7725
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89145
Ceres

Ceres

  • 221 North Rampart Boulevard
  • JW Marriott Las Vegas Resort & Spa
  • tel:702 869 7381
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89145
Calico Tanks

Calico Tanks

  • HCR 33, Box 5500
  • tel:702-515-5000
  • Las Vegas, 89124
Bonnie Springs Ranch Old Nevada

Bonnie Springs Ranch Old Nevada

  • 1 Gunfighter Lane
  • Blue Diamond, Clark County
  • tel:+1 702 875 4191
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89004
Agave - Las Vegas

Agave - Las Vegas

  • 10820 W. Charleston Blvd
  • tel:7022143500
  • Visit website
  • Las Vegas, 89135
Rosemary's Restaurant

Rosemary's Restaurant